Think Big When It Comes to Pots

We have a range of fantastically large planters.  There is nothing meek about these, but rather, they make a statement and demand attention.

So why and where would you use these?  When you choose a planter that’s over 400mm across what you’re paying for is a lifetime investment.  You’re planting a permanent solution, and a potted garden that will stand the test of time because the volume of potting mix it takes doesn’t dry out quickly, so you’re investing in success as well as size. 

Size matters not only because large pots can store the water and nutrients your plants need, but also because they add instant height.  This can be really important when you’re try to screen the neighbours and blocking out their window requires an extra lift!  Think of it as a garden hack that keeps neighbour’s happy and invest in something with a little more height than you had perhaps budgeted for, but it will be well worth the financial pain for the well-being!

So, what plants make great screens and are happy in a planter?

  1. NZ Christmas Bush – great for pots, these red flowering beauties are brilliant in sunny positions and will even cope with seaside situations where salt laden winds can cause grief to many plants. The staminate flowers occur enmasee throughout late spring and summer andare wonderful for attracting birds and bees into your garden.
  2. Native rainforest plants like lily pillies are wonderful for pots.
  3. Evergreen viburnums, like V. odoratissima, V.tinus and V. ‘Emerald Lustre’ are lushious, dense screens perfect for pots.
  4. Camellia sasanquas are wonderful autumn flowering hedging plants, but they can be a little slow off the mark. Give them a helping hand and pop them into a pot.
  5. Repeat flowering Hybrid Grevilleas can be great for not only screening, but also cut flowers. Look for ‘Pink Parfait’, ‘Moonlight’, ‘Majestic’, ‘Sandra Gordon’ and ‘Misty Pink’ for a living bouquet.

Want to create a BIG impact inside?  Read the Power of One for more ideas.

 

By: Meredith Kirton